Doctor administering sports physical to a patient

Sports Physicals Gyms

Sports physicals are preventative screenings routinely used to verify a patient’s physical health and ability to safely participate in athletic activity. Most schools and many sports leagues require sports physicals as a prerequisite for participation each season. At our office, we recommend sports physicals not only for athletes but also for anyone beginning a new exercise routine or training program. A sports physical can detect underlying health conditions that have the potential to interrupt participation in a sport or cause a future injury.

 

Did you know…

that a sports physical is for athletes of all ages and health backgrounds? Everyone – from small children to professional players – should undergo a sports physical before beginning any training or strenuous physical activity beyond what is normal for each participant.

Frequently Asked Questions

Should I get a sports physical?

Everyone needs a sports physical prior to beginning a new physically strenuous activity. If you are getting a physical prior to the start of a sports season, we recommend scheduling your physical several weeks in advance. This allows plenty of time for accommodating recommendations for treatment if necessary.

What should I expect during a sports physical?

A sports physical will examine your overall fitness and risk for health complications or injury. This includes a thorough review of your personal healthy history and an evaluation of your cardiovascular and musculoskeletal health. We will analyze your height, weight, flexibility, strength and reflexes, as well as listen to your heart and lungs.

What happens after my sports physical?

If your sports physical reveals no potential health problems, we will release you to play. Otherwise, we may make recommendations for modified or delayed sports participation. Some patients need to build up strength or physical fitness before participating in a sport. Others may need to modify their training schedules to accommodate for physical limitations or areas of the body that are at high-risk for injury.